Bachelor's in

Medicine

  • Schedule
    Daytime schedule
  • ECTS Credits
    180
  • Language
    French
  • Location
    Mons

Description

Medical studies: training for a multifaceted life project…
Become an expert in the field of health

Medical training takes places over two cycles (the Bachelor’s and the Master’s, totalling 6 years). First, students become experts in the field of health, in the preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. After this basic training, students have many career options, such as working in a hospital or a private practice, alone or in a team, with direct or less direct contact with patients (imaging, laboratory), in curative medicine or not (occupational, educational or forensic), etc. Following their basic training, the Specialised Master’s allows students to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to work in the field of their choice.

General training in life sciences, combining advanced scientific knowledge with human and interpersonal skills

At UMONS, students will have access to the first cycle of the medical curriculum. The Bachelor’s enables students to acquire a general education in life sciences, which are at the crossroads of “pure sciences” and “human sciences”. Putting students at the centre of their learning, our teachers pay particular attention to their acquisition of advanced scientific knowledge, as well as human and interpersonal skills.

Group work, presentations and placements are part of the 3-year Bachelor’s programme, resulting in students acquiring relevant expertise in teams and being able to communicate with empathy, behave with respect for each other, and develop ethical reflection. Frequent contact with the Faculty’s teachers and lab assistants during remediation activities and refresher courses allow for a gradual transition between secondary education and acquiring the ability to learn autonomously, which is an essential skill for continuing education throughout professional life.

Entrance and Access Examination

Only students who have passed the entrance and access examination can register for the Bachelor’s in Medicine. This guarantees that students have a thorough understanding of the scientific knowledge acquired at secondary school and makes it possible to tackle health-specific topics more quickly than in the past.  Link to Everything You Need to know about the Entrance Examination.

 A learning programme, from the normal human to pathological states and diseases

The Bachelor’s is divided into three blocks (years) or 6 terms. The first four terms are devoted to the knowledge of “the normal human”, from molecules (biochemistry, immunology, genetics) to tissues (histology) to the individual (physiology, neurophysiology), and from structure (anatomy, embryology) to functioning (psychology). Term 5 focuses on the introduction to pathological conditions in their different aspects: molecular (molecular biology of cancer, pathological biochemistry), tissue (pathological anatomy), functional (physiopathology, neurophysiopathology) and clinical (semiology). Formerly taught at Master level, the teaching of diseases is now covered in Term 6 of the Bachelor’s. This is particularly the case for cardio-circulatory diseases and respiratory diseases (medical, surgical and paediatric), as well as infectious diseases.

Throughout the Bachelor’s, courses focus directly on professional and human skills. Students quickly become accustomed to using their critical and scientific mind-set acquired through the basic theoretical courses in medical applications (sociology of health, learning in medical reasoning, clinical epidemiology). Relational aspects are very important in their future profession and are not forgotten. They are developed in a theoretical framework in the ‘Psychology’ and ‘An Introduction to General Medicine’ courses. Learning in this area is then reinforced by group work and presentations spread over the 3 years. An introductory medical placement also allows them to perceive the different facets of the patient-caregiver relationship.

Teaching and Research

With a wealth of internationally recognised researchers, our research and teaching units provide research-based learning and provide access to the third cycle (PhD).

Program and structure

The Bachelor’s is divided into three blocks (years) or 6 terms.

As mentioned before, unlike the Biomedical Sciences and Pharmaceutical Sciences courses, the Medicine curriculum no longer covers all the basics. The compulsory entrance examination, implemented in 2017, guarantees that the scientific skills covered in secondary school have been acquired by all the students registered on the Bachelor’s in Medicine.

This allows the courses to address health-specific topics more quickly. For example, mathematics will no longer be taught. The main notions of basic sciences covered in secondary school (Biology, Physics and Chemistry) will be briefly covered at the beginning of the relevant courses (educational components).

More medical-based courses can then be introduced into the programme more quickly, such as General Physiology in the first term of the first year of study.

Terms 1, 2, 3 and 4: The first four terms are devoted to the knowledge of “the normal human”, from molecules (biochemistry, immunology, genetics) to tissues (histology) to the individual (physiology, neurophysiology), and from structure (anatomy, embryology) to functioning (psychology).

Term 5 focuses on the introduction to pathological conditions in their different aspects: molecular (molecular biology of cancer, pathological biochemistry), tissue (pathological anatomy), functional (physiopathology, neurophysiopathology) and clinical (semiology).

Term 6: Formerly taught at Master level, the teaching of diseases is now covered in Term 6 of the Bachelor’s. This is particularly the case for cardio-circulatory diseases and respiratory diseases (medical, surgical and paediatric), as well as infectious diseases.

Throughout the Bachelor’s, courses focus directly on professional and human skills. Students quickly become accustomed to using their critical and scientific mind-set acquired through the basic theoretical courses in medical applications (sociology of health, learning in medical reasoning, clinical epidemiology). Relational aspects are very important in their future profession and are not forgotten. They are developed in a theoretical framework in the ‘Psychology’ and ‘An Introduction to General Medicine’ courses. Learning in this area is then reinforced by group work and presentations spread over the 3 years. An introductory medical placement also allows them to perceive the different facets of the patient-caregiver relationship.

Credits repartition

  • Basic Sciences
  • Pathological States
  • Approach to Medical Practice
  • English

Learning outcomes

At the end of the Bachelor in Medicine, students will be able to:

  • reason with the necessary rigour by applying the basic knowledge from Block 1 to the courses of Block 2
  • implement transversal skills, namely: establishing links between the different courses (anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and histology), integrating the knowledge of "the normal human" to understand pathological situations (pathophysiology), and working in teams as well as being able to communicate orally and in writing
  • perfectly master the knowledge of the “normal human” and the principles that determine organ failure
  • discuss the mechanisms involved in certain pathologies.

Opportunities

With the Bachelor's degree in Medicine, the student can continue their medical training at Master level at a university of their choice.

About this training

Sector
Health
Field
Medicine

Contact us for more info

Secrétariat des études
+32(0)65373501